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Pelvic Health Physical Therapy

Pelvic Health is a sub-specialty of physical therapy.
It can be defined as physical therapy to restore the pelvic region to a more functional and/or less painful state.

Pelvic Health Physical Therapists

Pelvic Health Physical Therapists receive specialized training in the evaluation and treatment of pain and dysfunction related to the pelvis and its corresponding muscles, bones and soft tissue structures. Pelvic Health Physical Therapists treat women and men with pelvic floor dysfunction. The pelvic floor muscles play an important role in support for bladder and bowel, sexual health, stabilization of the pelvis, and normal function during the childbearing period. Dysfunction in these muscles can result in bowel/bladder issues, pain, sexual dysfunction, and instability of the pelvis. Our therapists have taken additional courses that cover pelvic floor rehabilitation and how to properly evaluate and treat multiple conditions that involve the pelvic floor musculature.

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Targeted Therapy

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Personalized Assessment

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Reduce pain

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Improve Function

Pelvic Health PT

Why do I need this?

 The pelvic floor muscles play an important role in support for bladder and bowel, sexual health, stabilization of the pelvis, and normal function during the childbearing period. Dysfunction in these muscles can result in bowel/bladder issues, pain, sexual dysfunction, and instability of the pelvis. Our therapists have taken additional courses that cover pelvic floor rehabilitation and how to properly evaluate and treat multiple conditions that involve the pelvic floor musculature.

 What is included in the Initial Evaluation?

• Your first visit usually lasts about 1-1.5 hours. The therapist will spend time discussing your past medical history, current chief complaints, and any other relevant information regarding your visit.
• Your physical evaluation will include a general orthopedic physical therapy screen combine with a pelvic health specific evaluation including an internal assessment of the pelvic floor (vaginal and/or rectal as appropriate to your complaints).
• The therapist will discuss your findings a develop a realistic plan of care based on your findings, personal goals, and your schedule.
• The first session will include any treatment needed and you can expect to receive a home program from your therapist given through online portal.
• The therapist will then go over planned next visits which will range from 45-55 minutes in length.

 How should I prepare for my first visit?
• Wear comfortable clothing.
• If your prior functional level involves specific fitness activities or running, bring your exercise clothes and shoes.
• Bring a list of previous providers or treatments that you have tried for your condition.
• Fill out the pelvic health paperwork on our website prior to your visit.
• Fill out the bladder diary on our website if your complaints involve bladder/urinary symptoms.

Conditions Pelvic Health Physical Therapists Can Help

PreNatal

• Individualized exercise program • Instruction in proper exercise form
• Low back pain • Diastasis recti • Supportive care • Taping techniques

Post Partum

• Low back pain • Diastasis recti
• Scarring • C-Section, episiotomy, or perineal tear
• Pelvic floor weakness • Pelvic organ prolapse
• Urinary or fecal incontinence • Pelvic pain

Pelvic Pain

 Pudendal neuralgia • Penile fracture
• Generalized pain- abdomen, pelvis, hip, groin, low back, Sacroiliac dysfunction
• Specific pain- vulvar, testicular, penile, vaginal, clitoral, labial, rectal, tailbone/coccyx
• Pain with sitting • Pain during bowel movements or voiding
• Endometriosis pain • Interstitial cystitis (painful bladder syndrome)
• Painful period • Vaginismus

Elimination Dysfunction

• Constipation • Urinary urgency-frequency
• Urinary Incontinence • Fecal incontinence
• Overactive bladder • Incomplete emptying (bowel, bladder)
• Frequent urinary tract infections
• Hesitancy or intermittency

Supportive Dysfunction

• Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP)
• Diastasis Recti (separation of abdominals)

Sexual Dysfunction

• Dyspareunia (pain with vaginal intercourse)
• Anodyspareunia (painful anal intercourse)
• Peyronie’s disease • Pain with or after ejaculation
• Pain or difficulty with orgasm
• Persistent Genital Arousal Disorder (PGAD)

Peri- and Post- Surgical Issues

• Pelvic reconstruction • C-section or abdominal procedures
• Oncology interventions- surgical, radiation effects
• Gender reassignment surgery
• Post-vasectomy pain syndrome
• Pre- or post- prostatectomy surgeries